Feb 262008
 

Sometimes, when you install new software or a driver, you may find that the System is not stable. This is because; installing new software or a driver sometime will try to add its own version of some System files. In this scenario, running a System File Checker is the best option. SFC may also be run when you normally troubleshoot any Windows problems.

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Feb 262008
 

If you are using a Dial-Up connection and experience the following error while dialing

Error 650: Remote Access Server is not responding

The main reason could be that the wait time for the modem is not enough for handshake.

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Feb 202008
 

When you are troubleshooting a problem with your Windows especially a Windows Start up problem, the best place to start would be to create a Boot Log. This would create a file named Ntbtlog.txt in the C:\Windows directory with the list of drivers that tries to load. It adds entries for every successfully loaded driver referred by “Loaded Driver” and failed drivers reffered by “Did not load driver”.

This could define the root cause of the problem. It could be a device driver or a startup item that Windows tries loading at the startup. Once identified you can then fix the driver or startup item by either disabling it or updating to a proper version.

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Feb 202008
 

Windows XP and later provides you with a one step resolution to network problems on your PCs and Servers in the form of a Repair button under the properties of the network connection. This is a simple and effective way to resolve a network problem but do you know what exactly happens when you run this command?

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Jan 282008
 

If you are a heavy Command Prompt (DOS) user, this might well be a very useful tip. In the DOS prompt, the most commonly used command would be cd (change directory) to switch between directories that you work. If you working between more than one directory (say C:\Documents and Settings\username\desktop) and (say C:\Windows\system32) then everytime you change between direcories using the cd command, you need to type in the path as well (atleast I feel its not friendly).

Well here is a solution, Windows has the PUSHD & POPD DOS commands that help you navigating between these directories. PUSHD/POPD are great tools when navigating between directories and shares temporarily. PUSHD & POPD commands are the unix equivalents which can remember the directories that you navigate in the memory as Last IN First Out (LIFO). So, when you navigate between multiple directories and then need to comeback one step or two, you can simply comeback using one single command.

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