Oct 062008
 

Have you ever wondered where the network configuration settings like IP Address Subnet mask or the same settings provided by your DHCP server (propably your home broadband router) on a network interface or a wireless interface are stored on your computer?

Undoubtedly, these are stored in the Windows registry. While there is no need to change any of these values from Windows Registry as it is good enough to make the changes network settings, it is still good enough to where they are and what the related registry keys are.

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Sep 302008
 

In Windows 2008 and Windows Vista, we can control the Multicast support, infact to be precise, the level of Multicast support and the version of the IGMP protocol that is supported from Windows Registry.

By default, Windows 2008 and Windows Vista supports IGMPv3 and fully pariticipates in IGMP where it can both send and receive IPv4 multicast packets.

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Sep 282008
 

IP Soure routing is an option which allows the source of a packet to specify the path that the packet will take, and what path return packets sent back to the source will take. Source routing is useful when the default route that a connection will take fails or is suboptimal for some reason, or for network diagnostic purposes. However, even more is a menace as poses a severe security issue where malicous users can exploit this feature to cause DoS attacks or even bypass LAN security rules in place.

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Aug 212008
 


The Media Sensing feature in Windows 2000, Windows XP and later is used to detect whether the network media are in a link state. With Media Sense feature,  Windows senses a link state as UP or DOWN based on the link availability. When Windows detects a “down” state, it removes the bound protocols from that adapter until it is detected as “up” again.

Media Sensing feature is enabled by default in Windows except Windows Server 2003. However, in instances where you do not want Windows to sense link status (very unlikely) in which case, you can disable the Media Sensing feature from Windows Registry.

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Aug 172008
 


The Time To Live (TTL) value in an IPv4 packet determines the maximum number of links or hops on which an IPv4 packet is allowed to travel before being discarded. The default TTL value in Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista is set to 128. While the defaults are good enough and may never need changing, there may be instances where you may want to change the default TTL.
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