Aug 132008
 

Usually, if you want to see all the used and listening ports on your computer, you’d use the NETSTAT command.

Note: The NETSTAT command will show you whatever ports are open or in use, but it is NOT a port scanning tool!

Open command prompt

type in “netstat -an” and it will show you the “listening” ports

Output as follows

Active Connections

Proto Local Address Foreign Address State
TCP 0.0.0.0:135 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING
TCP 0.0.0.0:445 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING
TCP 127.0.0.1:1025 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING
TCP 127.0.0.1:1154 127.0.0.1:1155 ESTABLISHED
TCP 127.0.0.1:1155 127.0.0.1:1154 ESTABLISHED
TCP 127.0.0.1:1157 127.0.0.1:1158 ESTABLISHED
TCP 127.0.0.1:1158 127.0.0.1:1157 ESTABLISHED
TCP 127.0.0.1:5679 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING
TCP 127.0.0.1:27015 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING
TCP 192.168.0.2:139 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING
TCP 192.168.0.2:1734 80.169.170.150:443 CLOSE_WAIT
TCP 192.168.0.2:1856 68.178.211.88:80 CLOSE_WAIT
TCP 192.168.0.2:2062 85.17.144.69:80 CLOSE_WAIT
TCP 192.168.0.2:2063 85.17.144.69:80 CLOSE_WAIT

You can redirect it to a text file by adding >c:\openports.txt to the command

you can type “netstat -o” to get a list of all the owning process ID associated with each connection

Output as follows

Active Connections

Proto Local Address Foreign Address State PID
TCP firstuser:1154 localhost:1155 ESTABLISHED 2312
TCP firstuser:1155 localhost:1154 ESTABLISHED 2312
TCP firstuser:1157 localhost:1158 ESTABLISHED 2312
TCP firstuser:1158 localhost:1157 ESTABLISHED 2312
TCP firstuser:1734 80.169.170.150:https CLOSE_WAIT 2952
TCP firstuser:1856 linhost161.prod.mesa1.secureserver.net:http CLO
SE_WAIT 1348
TCP firstuser:2062 85.17.144.69:http CLOSE_WAIT 1348
TCP firstuser:2063 85.17.144.69:http CLOSE_WAIT 1348
TCP firstuser:2073 www.oneindia.in:http CLOSE_WAIT 1348
TCP firstuser:2079 www.oneindia.in:http CLOSE_WAIT 1348
TCP firstuser:2810 ug-in-f189.google.com:http ESTABLISHED 1348

Using Fport

fport reports all open TCP/IP and UDP ports and maps them to the owning application. This is the same information you would see using the ‘netstat -an’ command, but it also maps those ports to running processes with the PID, process name and path. Fport can be used to quickly identify unknown open ports and their associated applications.

Download fport from here

Using Active Ports

Active Ports – easy to use tool for Windows NT/2000/XP that enables you to monitor all open TCP and UDP ports on the local computer. Active Ports maps ports to the owning application so you can watch which process has opened which port. It also displays a local and remote IP address for each connection and allows you to terminate the owning process. Active Ports can help you to detect trojans and other malicious programs.

Download from here

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  8 Responses to “How to check open ports on windows Vista/XP”

  1. thanks it’s very good information
    it’s really helpful

  2. good nice information

  3. Hi,

    This is helpful but i m searching for how can we search single port is working means open or not and which server running which port how we can find?

  4. Good One

  5. alert(‘hacked by Tr0jan32′)
    HACKED BY TR0JAN32

  6. I’ve been hunting for an Active Ports replacement for Windows 7 for ages. Turns out there was one there all along.

    Open Task Manager and on the Performance tab there is a button that launches “Resource Monitor”. Once open, go to the Network tab and under “TCP Connections” you can view a list of processes and ports – both sortable. Job done – phew!

  7. Open Task Manager and on the Performance tab there is a button that launches “Resource Monitor”. Once open, go to the Network tab and under “TCP Connections” you can view a list of processes and ports…”

    Thanks for sharing, Phil! This is great!

    :-)

  8. thanks

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